As the global energy transition gains pace, the GET Conference and Exhibition is a unique international forum for converting commitment into action. The convergence of multiple factors has brought the world to an inflection point, where the scale of the opportunity is matched only by the consequences of failure. Transformative progress on climate can only be achieved by breaking down silos and bringing industries closer together. GET will remove barriers and facilitate dialogue, unblock bottlenecks and solve common problems to create real change. This has never been attempted before on this scale. 

The event will bring together a wide range of stakeholders, providing a forum for cross-industry connection, the exchange of new ideas, collaboration and innovation.

Strategic Conference Agenda

Monday 01 July 2024

Tuesday 02 July 2024

Wednesday 03 July 2024

10:00 10:30

GET Congress 2024 Opening Ceremony

Plenary Theatre

Welcome to the inaugural GET Congress and Exhibition
Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme

Session format: Keynote address and 1-2-1 

Introductory keynote address

In this opening session, one of the world’s most renowned voices on energy transition will issue a call for authentic and evidence-based leadership, and substantive action on shared international decarbonisation goals.

10:30 11:15

Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Coherent international action on the energy transition

Global decarbonisation is a mass-participation effort, requiring nonpartisan engagement and scientific evidence-based, outcomes-led action. Open channels of communication across and between sectors has been key to furthering the consensus on holistic, achievable, and socially inclusive net zero roadmaps. Policymakers around the world are seeking a balance between national economic prerogatives and co-ordinated, multilateral climate action, paving the way for a multi-speed, single-destination global energy transition. 

But while much work has been done to align net zero incentives across industry boundaries and international borders, frustrations around the pace of progress remain. This opening panel session will focus on the continued importance of dialogue in building understanding between governments, and across industrial sectors and geographies. How are stakeholders in the global energy transition identifying pain points, managing fair and unfair expectations, and developing market-appropriate net zero frameworks? And to what extent have overarching political, economic, commercial and social considerations shifted as the energy transition discussion has matured?

Audience insights: Assess how the international community is approaching the energy transition, and the continued importance of multilateral dialogue in creating the conditions for equitable climate action.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Sustainability at scale; Inclusive green growth

11:15 11:45

Tour of the exhibition floor

11:45 12:30

Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme
programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Empowering industries to accelerate the transition: Striking the right balance on lower carbon industrial strategies

Climate policy interventions across the world suggest differing schools of thought on how legislation can best facilitate the energy transition. While recent policy programmes in the USA and India have focused on incentivising lower carbon activities, the EU has favoured a mix of incentives and regulation. This “carrot or stick” dilemma is part of a wider global discussion on integrated industrial policy for a lower carbon future. The challenge for legislators is to find the point at which market incentives create a “rising tide to lift all boats” and regulatory frameworks serve as an effective deterrent against emissions, without placing upward pressure on costs. This picture is further complicated by differing economic and environmental priorities in the Global North and South.

How can energy and hard to abate industry leaders assist policymakers as they work towards a single, internationally agreed direction of travel that remains sensitive to unique market and sectoral pressures? Could tight regulatory frameworks in one part of the world and generous incentive schemes in another create a push/pull effect that damages international alignment on net zero? 

Audience insights: A cross-industry view on how new and evolving climate policies are affecting business environments, and the differing impact of legislation across and between markets.

Themes: Sustainability at scale; Decarbonisation capital; Inclusive green growth

12:30 13:00

Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Keynote address and 1-2-1

Partnership working and purposeful action on an inclusive Global Energy Transition

Listen to insights on a cross-border, cross-sector energy transition from a world leading authority on strategies to achieve net zero ambitions.

13:00 14:00

Networking lunch

14:00 15:00

Global Energy Transition Critical Agenda

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Paper presentation and panel discussion

Funding the energy transition: Overcoming obstacles to Final Investment Decision

Economic headwinds and larger geostrategic trends have added further financial pressure on businesses seeking capital for lower carbon projects. With no clear methodology for demonstrating bankability, typically uneven risk profiles and uncertainty on regulatory compliance, a recurring roadblock on the road to net zero is restricted access to capital.

In this Critical Agenda session, GET knowledge partner, IONIC partners will present a series of recommendations, developed in consultation with a range of stakeholders, for overcoming these difficulties and deploying much needed energy transition funds at global scale.

In a follow-up panel discussion, experts will consider these findings, as well as the unfolding impact of landmark net zero legislation. Have policy initiatives such as REPowerEU, the Inflation Reduction Act (USA) and China’s 14th Five-Year Plan successfully tempted investors into the green arena? Or were early predictions of a “race to the top” on lower carbon energy solutions overly optimistic?

Audience insights: A GET Critical Agenda session featuring the presentation of an exclusive knowledge paper detailing the immense investment potential of the energy transition.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Decarbonisation capital; Corporate and consumer behaviours

14:00 14:45

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

In focus: The energy transition in Europe

The EU’s stated ambition, enshrined in law, to make Europe the world’s first climate-neutral continent is founded on three decades of climate progress. Contrary to trends in other industrialised and industrialising markets, GHG emissions across the bloc fell by 24% between 1990-2020. The EU Green Deal is a comprehensive and generously funded suite of legislation, designed to ensure that the long-term economic health of the region is based on net zero principles. The latest package of Green Deal measures – Fit for 55, finalised in October 2023 – includes a detailed blueprint for achieving 55% emissions reductions against the 1990 benchmark by decade’s end. The larger part of the challenge between now and then may lie in maintaining unity of purpose between member states, as sluggish growth and the war in Ukraine threaten to strain relations.   

Audience insights: Analysis of the range of structural and geopolitical challenges that could jeopardise Europe’s energy transition progress, and the means by which policymakers and industry can overcome them.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Corporate and consumer behaviour change; Climate action beyond carbon

14:45 15:30

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

US supply, European demand: What and where now for global LNG markets?

As recently as 2021, the question of what role LNG might play in the European energy system of the future seemed resolved. Dr Werner Hoyer, President of the European Investment Bank famously stated that, as far as the continent’s decision makers were concerned, natural gas was “over.” But the supply shock caused by the invasion of Ukraine reversed the narrative, as European nations sought to avert an energy crisis by replacing Russian piped gas with LNG. The scramble caused a wider reconfiguration of global energy markets, among the many symptoms of which was record high levels of global coal demand in 2023. The surging strategic importance of LNG in Europe led to speculation that it might be reimagined as a destination, rather than bridging fuel for the continent. The crisis served to underline its key attributes: dispatchability, reliability, lower-carbon than coal and more trusted than nuclear.   

But the moratorium on new US LNG exports, announced in January 2024, has shifted the discussion again. For the Biden administration, America’s recent elevation to world leading LNG exporter contrasted uncomfortably with longstanding commitments on net zero. Moreover, the inflationary impact of historically high export volumes on domestic energy prices was an acknowledged cause of discomfort in the White House at the beginning of an election year. European governments have so far reacted calmly to the announcement, but many industry leaders have been more vocal, warning that the pause could eventuate a new period of price volatility. Tightness in gas supplies is expected to linger through 2024, and further geopolitical disruptions are a live and ongoing concern. Should policymakers on both sides of the Atlantic pay greater heed to their misgivings? Can the industry make a convincing and principled case for the long-term future of LNG in Europe? And how does the renewables sector view the arguments in favour of LNG as a cover for intermittency and bridging abatement fuel?

Audience insights: Analysis of unfolding LNG market dynamics, and the suitability of LNG in a net zero European energy mix.

Themes: Net zero impasses, Inclusive green growth, Corporate and consumer behaviour change

15:00 15:45

Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Insights from the forefront: Business leaders at the helm of energy transition ventures

Expanding the discussion on financing critical energy transition ventures, in this session, senior industry leaders will be invited to share experiences of planning, financing and delivering projects. Analysis will include investment strategies, new and emerging project partnerships and future forecasts. Further consideration will be given to the cultural differences between corporate and finance industry backed vehicles.

Audience insights: Senior industry perspectives on shifting investment priorities and new funding structures for decarbonisation projects.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Decarbonisation capital; Corporate and consumer behaviours

15:45 16:30

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Decarbonisation capital de-risked: Mechanisms for unlocking energy transition funding

The United Nations Environmental Programme Finance Initiative estimates that climate investment opportunities could be worth up to US $275 trillion between now and 2050. Contrary to fears around the costs of net zero, the research points to the enormous economic growth potential of the energy transition. Nonetheless, vast funding gaps remain, with high upfront capital needs, low short-term yields, and uncertain longer-term market conditions testing many investors’ risk appetite. Tax reduction schemes and subsidies for mature climate technologies have been proven to incentivise demand for mature energy transition technologies. The IEA estimates that renewables will be the largest source of global electricity generation by 2025; meanwhile, one in seven vehicles purchased in 2022 was an electric vehicle – a tripling of the sales share since 2020.

But the technologies that will support the energy transition in hard-to-abate sectors have not matured at an equivalent pace and remain under-incentivised and in need of capital injections. Furthermore, risk factors in emerging and frontier markets are inhibiting much needed energy transition investment in some of the world’s most climate vulnerable places. Can policymakers go further with support schemes to upscale hydrogen, encourage low emissions fuels, and incentivise carbon capture and other such technologies? Are Public-Private Partnerships a viable means of spreading risk? And could sovereign wealth funds utilise their financial and political capital to de-risk investments in traditionally higher risk markets and breakthrough climate solutions?

Audience insights: A macro view of the global low carbon and net zero investment landscape, and recurring obstacles to the deployment of capital.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Sustainability at scale; Decarbonisation capital

16:00 16:45

Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Ending energy exclusion as the transition picks up pace

Geopolitical, economic and demographic challenges in the world’s emerging markets continue to complicate the challenge of the energy transition. Energy supply bottlenecks and resultant price volatility, combined with population and energy demand growth, have rendered proven decarbonisation pathways hard to replicate in the Global South and East.

While coal substitution remains a stated aim in many ASEAN nations, IEA figures show global coal demand grew in the first half of 2023. China, India and Southeast Asia are expected to account for 75% of all global coal consumption at year’s end. Competition for cleaner hydrocarbons such as LNG remains intense, while the risk profiles of new energy projects continue to deter investors.

The Loss and Damage Fund agreed at COP 27 was a clear acknowledgement that those countries least culpable for planetary warming are often those most vulnerable to its effects. Nonetheless, the fund has, thus far, proven difficult to administer. Can global policymakers agree on creative financial instruments to overcome the impasse? And how can the energy industry do more to expedite infrastructure build out and technology transfer, and provide the world’s most vulnerable communities with the tools they need to decarbonise?

Audience insights: Analysis of energy transition priorities in emerging economies, and what the international community can do to help balance climate and growth prerogatives.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Decarbonisation capital; Inclusive green growth

16:30 17:15

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Decarbonising the global hydrogen value chain

Hydrogen production remains a stubbornly carbon intensive process across the world. IEA figures show that over 20% of all hydrogen produced in 2022 relied on coal feedstocks; 62% of global output came from CCUS-free natural gas, while CCUS-enabled natural gas accounted for less than 1%. Green hydrogen, arguably the most talked about solution in global decarbonisation discourse, made up roughly 0.1% of the whole.

Expectations for clean hydrogen have grown as international discussions around climate change have reached new levels of urgency. According to the Centre on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University, over 50 countries have now released a national hydrogen strategy, but grand governmental ambitions have yet to translate into utility scale solutions. The global project pipeline could provide 38 Mt of clean hydrogen by 2030 – enough to service 40% of global hydrogen demand at today’s levels – but projects are notoriously, and seemingly insolubly, capital intensive. In recent years, macro factors have placed further upward pressure on the cost of equipment, exacerbating what is already an entrenched problem. Fiscal support schemes have helped, but have tended to focus on supply side incentives, rather than boosting demand certainty.

Nonetheless, a handful of landmark announcements point the way to a future in which clean hydrogen is produced affordably, at utility-scale for a consumption-ready market. What can be learned from these projects, and the policy frameworks that have enabled them? And is hydrogen in danger of falling behind other sources of lower carbon and renewable energy?

Audience insights: New and historic breakthroughs in the race to bring low carbon hydrogen to industrial scale.

Themes: Net zero impasses, Sustainability at scale, Decarbonisation capital

16:45 17:30

Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

In whose back yard? Locational challenges for new energy infrastructure

While the issue of funding for lower carbon energy projects remains the source of much discussion, corollary questions around where new infrastructure should be located have increased in salience.

Localised opposition to new infrastructure developments is not a new thing; the phrase NIMBY (short for “not in my back yard”) was coined to describe the phenomenon as far back as the 1970s. But vigorous debate over the placement of wind and solar farms, as well as new substations, nuclear plants and pylons, has increasingly become a feature of climate-related political discourse in some of the world’s wealthiest economies. 

The Federal road-building boom in 1950s and 60s America is often said to have left a legacy of segregated and impoverished communities, demonstrating how decisions around infrastructure location can have long-lived social consequences. In order to avoid a repeat of past mistakes, and achieve broad social buy-in, appropriate spatial planning and regulatory frameworks will be crucial, as will authentic citizen engagement. As the need to build vast and connected renewables networks intensifies, the question of 'where' will require as much careful attention as that of how.

Audience insights: Explore the challenge of engaging communities and building enthusiasm for much needed renewable energy infrastructure.

Themes: Sustainability at scale; Inclusive green growth; Corporate and consumer behaviour change

17:15 18:00

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

The urbanising world: Planning and building net zero cities

The global population is projected to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, with nearly 7 billion of those people expected to live in the world’s cities and towns. Urbanisation is one of the defining megatrends of the 21st century, and a complicating factor on the road to net zero. Cities are the engine rooms of the global economy. With large, concentrated populations, geographical vulnerabilities, and other exacerbating factors such as urban heat islands, they are also uniquely susceptible to the devastating effects of climate change.

City authorities often have limited powers to enforce climate mitigating policy, but the key areas in which they can enact meaningful change is in the planning, development and operation of transport, real estate and infrastructure. As urban populations increase, so too will the need for lower carbon energy, amenities and services. New approaches to property, public space, mass transit and digitalisation, along with imaginative climate resilience and adaptation schemes, and shared and circular economic initiatives are already helping cities meet their climate obligations. Can those successes inform national and international practice? And how can leaders in the energy, tech and hard to abate sectors contribute to the challenge of urban decarbonisation and ensure that cities continue to drive economic growth and opportunity.

Audience insights: City leaders and urbanisation experts share their net zero roadmaps and new approaches to creating liveable and lower emissions neighbourhoods.

Themes: Sustainability at scale; Inclusive green growth; Climate action beyond carbon

10:00 10:30

Global Energy Transition Leadership programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Keynote address and 1-2-1

The new attention economy: Countering climate disinformation

While the scientific community has reached near unanimous consensus on manmade climate change, and multilateral plans for a greener global economy are taking shape, popular perception remains in the balance. Across much of the developed world, net zero scepticism is an obdurate feature of public discussion fuelled in part by a new media ecosystem in which it can be difficult to separate reliable and reputable reporting from bogus journalism.

The question of how to effectively counteract fake news is both pressing and unresolved, demanding the full participation of public and private sector organisations. Climate disinformation undermines international consensus, disrupts co-ordinated action on net zero, and can negatively influence consumer behaviours. How can all stakeholders, from governments and businesses to media platforms and private individuals, build resilience to the deliberate corruption of the global conversation on climate?

Audience insights: A world leading communications expert shares techniques for managing the climate narrative, including thoughts on how public and private sector organisations can effectively spotlight their energy transition initiatives.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Corporate and consumer behaviour change; Climate action beyond carbon

10:00 10:45

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

In focus: The energy transition in North America

The US Inflation Reduction Act and Canada’s complementary, perhaps retaliatory, 2023 budget which carved out CA$80bn for green energy investments, have placed North America at the centre of the energy transition universe.

In the US, the first fruits of the IRA are showing. Nearly 200,000 new jobs have been created in the clean energy sectors, with new project investment pushing $300bn. Significantly, the majority of both the jobs and investments have so far accrued to Republican districts, suggesting a future in which the Act can achieve sustainable bipartisan support.

Nonetheless, localised opposition to critical new infrastructure projects, continued reliability issues in electricity grids, and the complexity of phasing Chinese goods out of the supply chain rank high on the list of lingering uncertainties. And internationally, the fear remains that American largesse may serve only to suck the oxygen out of the global energy transition as smaller markets – Canada included – struggle to compete.

So, 16 months on from its signing, and 6 months out from a Presidential election, is the Inflation Reduction Act inspiring inclusive global progress, or widening the gap between the USA and the rest?

Audience insights: Analysis of the domestic and international ramifications of the Inflation Reduction Act, and the competitive challenge it poses to America’s closest neighbours.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Decarbonisation capital; Inclusive green growth

10:30 11:15

Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme

Session format: Panel discussion

Harnessing the green economic growth opportunity

Sustainability reporting is now a crucial operational priority for businesses, driven by new shareholder and customer expectations, and an increasingly stringent regulatory landscape. Often complex reporting guidelines, that can differ greatly across territories and jurisdictions, require companies to amass and manage an ever-broader spread of information. This can be used to demonstrate over- and underperformance on climate goals, for both internal and external scrutiny. Moreover, datasets can provide valuable insight into customer and market trends, opportunities for operational efficiency gains, and risk identification and mitigation processes. Bad inputs lead to bad outputs, but when compiled and managed correctly, data is more than simply a tool for performance reporting; it can be an equally crucial enabler of performance improvement.

In order to get ahead in the energy transition, forward-looking companies must integrate analytics into broader digital transformation strategies. What is the Big Tech sector doing to supply the energy and hard-to-abate industries with bespoke tools to support the journey to net zero? And how are authorities in the space balancing the requirement for new software and new expertise, as 21st century industry becomes increasingly data-depndent?

Audience insights: Analysis of how data, commonly referred to as “the new oil”, is transforming reporting processes and driving value creation in the energy and energy-intensive industries.

Themes: Sustainability at scale, Inclusive green growth, Corporate and consumer behaviour change

10:45 11:30

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Voluntary carbon markets: An evolving mechanism for the global energy transition

With the Paris Rulebook on compliance carbon markets still to be ratified by the international community, the debate around voluntary carbon markets has taken on new importance. By commercialising climate overperformance, the voluntary market is a breakthrough initiative on emissions reduction in industry. The more profitable carbon reduction becomes, the greater the incentive to go further. And if revenues raised from offset sales are channelled back into climate research and development, companies can create a virtuous circle in which the successes multiply.

Conversely, where companies struggle with industrial, structural or market-based barriers to emissions abatement, carbon credits are a short-term means by which to comply with regulatory, legal and ESG expectations. The voluntary carbon market could represent the ideal of a green economy, in which climate performance becomes a commercial, as well as environmental and ethical imperative. But in order to realise this ideal, more work must be done to ensure market integrity. Recent analysis undertaken by The Guardian newspaper raised concerns about 47 of the world’s largest 50 offset projects. While the findings have been fiercely disputed, the report nonetheless highlights the need to resolve questions of additionality, and address concerns around transparency and performance measurement. So how is global thinking and practice on voluntary carbon markets evolving?

Audience insights: Assessment of the difficulties inherent in establishing trusted voluntary carbon markets and the prospective decarbonisation gains that these markets would offer.

Themes: Decarbonisation capital; Inclusive green growth; Corporate and consumer behaviour change

11:30 12:15

Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Can generative artificial intelligence unlock critical climate progress?

John Kerry famously stated, in a 2021 BBC interview, that half of emissions reductions necessary to achieve net zero will be delivered by yet to be invented technologies. His bold prediction served to underline the belief that the energy transition will be a both a feature and catalyst of the fourth industrial revolution.

AI’s superhuman ability to parse sprawling datasets and recognise patterns could be key to unlocking energy solutions that have so far eluded the best minds on the planet. The IEA has identified lower carbon industrial technologies as one of a number of decarbonisation puzzles that could be solved by machine learning. Quantum analysis of normally siloed datasets could help to identify common pain points across the hard-to-abate sectors and foster improved cross-industry collaboration.

The recent signing of the Bletchley Declaration on AI Safety marked a watershed moment for multilateral cooperation on AI. International action on maximising the potential benefits while minimising the harms could be particularly impactful in the energy and hard-to-abate sectors, and on longer term efforts to regenerate the planet.

Audience insights: An expert view on generative artificial intelligence as a problem-solving tool with the potential to unlock new low carbon solutions, and revolutionise industrial processes.

Themes: Sustainability at scale; Inclusive green growth; Climate action beyond carbon

12:00 12:45

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Accelerating the global skills transition

In February 2023, a European Investment Bank survey of over 12,500 organisations illustrated in full the severity of net zero skills shortages in the EU. Over 80% of businesses and 60% of public sector organisations reported that a lack of access to appropriately skilled workers had impeded their decarbonisation efforts. The developing system-of-systems global energy mix marks the greatest change in energy supply and demand habits since the beginning of the industrial age, with IRENA estimating that the transition could create 26 million new jobs by decade’s end. Human capital deficits will be a constraint on the full potential of this generational opportunity to spur economic growth and improve social wellbeing. The skills gap can only be narrowed through collaborative, multi-industry and cross-border action, involving both public and private sectors.

What steps can industry leaders take to identify and address shortages in the labour force across value chains, and ensure adequate supply of skilled workers in new and existing specialisms? How are educational institutions futureproofing academic and training curricula as climate technologies and new energy solutions evolve? And can generative artificial intelligence programmes be deployed to augment human capital capacities in at-need sectors and markets?

Audience insights: Strategies for identifying and plugging emerging skills gaps and creating an agile and futureproofed labour force.

Themes: Inclusive green growth; Corporate and consumer behaviour change; Climate action beyond carbon

12:15 13:15

Global Energy Transition Critical Agenda

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Paper presentation and panel discussion

Tackling the oil and gas industry’s methane challenge

Methane is responsible for almost a third of the emissions–induced increase in global temperatures since the start of the industrial era, second only to carbon dioxide (CO2) in its impact on climate change.

To help reduce this, the oil and gas industry must tackle its methane emissions. The sector accounts for almost a quarter of human-caused

methane emissions, coming from both large–scale venting and innumerable small, undetected or unreported leaks across the oil and gas value chain.

In this critical agenda session, our knowledge partners, Wood Mackenzie will present a series of recommendations, developed in consultation with a range of stakeholders, for utilising new and existing methane emissions abatement solutions. In a follow-up panel discussion, experts will consider the findings.

Audience insights: A GET Critical Agenda session featuring the presentation of an exclusive knowledge paper detailing achievable means of making critical industrial methane emissions reductions, in line with 1.5⁰C pathways.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Corporate and consumer behaviour change; Climate action beyond carbon

12:45 13:30

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Harnessing the power of data for optimised corporate performance, sustainability reporting and value creation

Sustainability reporting is now a crucial operational priority for businesses, driven by new shareholder and customer expectations, and an increasingly stringent regulatory landscape. Often complex reporting guidelines, that can differ greatly across territories and jurisdictions, require companies to amass and manage an ever-broader spread of information. This can be used to demonstrate over- and underperformance on climate goals, for both internal and external scrutiny. Moreover, datasets can provide valuable insight into customer and market trends, opportunities for operational efficiency gains, and risk identification and mitigation processes. Bad inputs lead to bad outputs, but when compiled and managed correctly, data is more than simply a tool for performance reporting; it can be an equally crucial enabler of performance improvement.

In order to get ahead in the energy transition, forward-looking companies must integrate analytics into broader digital transformation strategies. What is the Big Tech sector doing to supply the energy and hard-to-abate industries with bespoke tools to support the journey to net zero? And how are authorities in the space balancing the requirement for new software and new expertise, as 21st century industry becomes increasingly data-dependent?

Audience insights: Analysis of how data, commonly referred to as “the new oil”, is transforming reporting processes and driving value creation in the energy and energy-intensive industries.

Themes: Sustainability at scale, Inclusive green growth, Corporate and consumer behaviour change

14:15 15:15

Global Energy Transition Critical Agenda

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Paper presentation and panel discussion

Decarbonising the global shipping industry

The shipping sector is responsible for moving roughly 90% of globally traded goods, and 3% of worldwide CO2 equivalent emissions. Recent growth in shipping demand has led to a commensurate rise in sector-based emissions, evidence of the tension between economic growth prerogatives and climate action.

In mid-2023, the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) released a revised GHG Strategy which aims to bring the pace of decarbonisation in the shipping sector into line with the Paris Agreement. The new IMO target has shifted from a 50% reduction in maritime emissions by 2050, to net-zero by that date.

However, this ambitious target is beset by a number of troublesome realities. The vast array of seafaring vessels currently in use, lingering uncertainty around compliance, unproven technologies, underdeveloped infrastructure and a shortage of deployable funds make for a familiar set of challenges. In many ways, the challenge of emissions reduction in the maritime industry will serve as a bellwether for other hard-to-abate sectors. 

In this Critical Agenda session, GET knowledge partners Lansdowne Moritz will present a series of recommendations for surmounting these obstacles and realising the IMO’s vision for lower carbon shipping.

Then, in a follow-up panel discussion, experts will consider these findings.

Audience insights: Assess the growth and diversification of low-carbon alternative marine fuels, and the wider global maritime regulatory environment.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Sustainability at scale; Corporate and consumer behaviour change

14:30 15:15

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Investment in innovation: Organisational cultures and the energy transition

The journey to net zero calls for an end to business-as-usual in many facets of life, but the need for new norms is perhaps most evident in the corporate world. Cultures and processes that helped bring on the climate crisis cannot be retained as attention turns to the urgent task of reversing and repairing the damage. Chief among the challenges for businesses is how to redraw organisational and operational blueprints to encourage innovation and empower innovators.  

A core requirement is authentic and courageous leadership. Many of the values that define innovation cultures are freighted with risk. Freedom to fail, willingness to deviate from proven pathways, and open, collaborative structures may seem counterintuitive, but they are the defining characteristics of some of the 21st century’s most celebrated businesses. While rigid hierarchies suffocate creativity, leaders must lead, setting the tone and direction of travel. By extension, innovation cannot thrive without investment.

The global race for talent has become increasingly competitive. New entrants into the workforce – the leaders of tomorrow – are digitally savvy and more motivated by ethical considerations than ever before. The companies that succeed in attracting the “best of the best” from this cohort will be those that offer dynamic, open, inclusive and mission-focused environments. How are visionaries in the energy and hard-to-abate sectors harnessing the spirit of the fourth industrial revolution and adapting corporate norms for the challenge of the energy transition?

Audience insights: A look at how to successfully foster a spirit of fearlessness and innovation in organisational cultures.

Themes: Decarbonisation capital, Corporate and consumer behaviour change, Climate action beyond carbon

15:15 16:15

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Can global supply chains service increase renewables demand?

The IEA’s Net Zero Emissions scenario targets a doubling of renewable energy capacities, from 30% of total global power generation today to 60% by 2050. And in many markets, favourable taxation and other incentives have caused a boom in electric vehicle sales, with 2.3 million electric cars sold worldwide in Q1 2023 alone. And that figure is entirely reflective of recent trends: EVs have risen from 5% of the global market in 2020, to 14% in 2022. Such immense upward demand pressures are placing added strain on global supply chains already struggling under the weight of the COVID-19 pandemic and extraordinary recent geopolitical events.

A shortage of operational mines, geographic concentration of production and processing sites, and Chinese dominance of bulk material supplies all represent obvious fragilities in the clean energy supply chain. A mix of political instability and ESG concerns have inhibited investor participation in many established rare earth minerals markets. And efforts to create multipolarity in supply sources have suffered from complex permitting regimes, lengthy project completion timelines, and local community opposition.

The establishment in 2022 of the Minerals Security Partnership, and various clauses contained within the US Inflation Reduction Act, suggest that antifragility in the renewables supply chain is a rising international concern. How realistic are ambitions for renewable and lower carbon energy upscale against the backdrop of volatility in global trading systems? Is there a danger that country specific industrial polices such as the US Inflation Reduction Act will hamper global trade and create anticompetitive trading practices? 

Audience insights: A spotlight on the challenge of diversifying critical minerals supply in line with increased demand for renewable energies, as the global logistics battles lingering disruption.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Sustainability at scale; Inclusive green growth

15:15 16:00

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Planes, trains and automobiles: Decarbonising long-haul and heavy-duty transport

Expanding on the themes of the GET Critical agenda session Decarbonising the global shipping industry, this discussion will focus on the challenge of reducing emissions in other heavy emitting freight and transport sectors. 

The mobility of goods and materials and people is essential to the health of international trade, but global transport is responsible for nearly one-fifth of all carbon emissions. Simply put, any hope for an economically viable energy transition, that creates rather than hinders inclusive growth prospects, rests upon the adoption of greener transport solutions. Work continues to diversify fuel sources, and scale their production, develop new propulsion technologies while optimising those that already exist, and change attitudes around personal private mobility. How are leaders in the road, rail and aviation industries approaching this combined challenge?

Audience insights: A holistic look at emissions reductions initiatives in the commercial, commuter and leisure transport sectors.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Sustainability at scale; Corporate and consumer behaviour change

16:15 17:00

Global Energy Transition Changemakers programme

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Do carbon capture technologies have an image problem?

If carbon capture technologies are to be deployable internationally, the industry must develop an infrastructure network comparable in size and scope to the global LNG infrastructure network. Furthermore, if this infrastructure is to effectively drive emissions reductions between now and mid-century, the build-out must be complete within a decade. Such progress seems implausible without policy interventions similar to those that are driving renewables capacities up and costs down.

But carbon capture technologies remain the source of much conjecture. To some, they are as yet unproven, even ineffective; to others, a means by which the hydrocarbons sector can go about its business as usual. So, do carbon capture technologies have an image problem? And if so, how can those negative perceptions be remedied?

Audience insights: Better demonstrate the effectiveness, bankability and scalability of carbon capture projects, and counter doubts and negative perceptions about this vital emissions reduction tool.

Themes: Sustainability at scale; Decarbonisation capital; Inclusive green growth

16:30 17:15

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

The cost of living: Will consumers pay for lower carbon products?

The question of who bears ultimate responsibility for climate change – and crucially, who should shoulder the cost of decarbonisation – remains contentious at both macro and micro level.

Research has shown that wealth correlates with emissions. It is well-established that emerging economies have made a lesser historical contribution to human-made climate change. And within wealthier societies, it is those communities impacted by generational poverty that have the smallest carbon footprint, and those same communities that are hardest pressed by the economic realities of energy transition.

Can more be done to make environmentally conscious consumer choices more economically viable? In an age of global polycrisis, is the climate emergency a waning priority for ordinary households? And, if so, how great a threat does that pose to progress on net zero?

Audience insights: Assess the likely impact on household incomes of the energy transition and share cross-industry insights on managing green premiums for consumers.

Themes: Sustainability at scale; Decarbonisation capital; Corporate and consumer behaviour change

17:00 18:00

Global Energy Transition Critical Agenda

Plenary Theatre

Session format: Paper presentation and panel discussion

Climate change regulation without borders

In the words of former German Chancellor Angela Merkel, "climate change knows no borders." It is a global phenomenon that transcends borders, affecting everyone. Nevertheless, in order to keep pace with accelerated global emissions targets and developing technologies, as well as changing demands and socio-political dynamics, governments worldwide have been forced to introduce their own rules. The result is a patchwork of widely different regulations.

While we have not yet understood the full negative impact of climate change, we have also not yet captured the potential of climate change mitigation measures to create jobs, growth, and prosperity. In order to be able to fully realise the green economic growth opportunity, actors in the marketplace need to know their obligations, and have a chance of meeting them. That is only fully possible if we adopt climate change rules that ‘know no borders’. There is a pressing need for worldwide rules based on an agreed set of fundamental principles as regards both incentives and penalties.

In this Critical Agenda session, our knowledge partners Gibson Dunn, will present a series of recommendations, developed in consultation with a range of stakeholders, on achieving international climate regulatory alignment. In a follow-up panel discussion, experts will consider the findings.

Audience insights: An in-depth look at the challenge of global regulatory harmonisation, and with the potential benefits for investors, existing players and new market entrants, and consumers.

Themes: Sustainability at scale; Inclusive green growth; Corporate and consumer behaviour change

17:15 18:00

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Can circular and regenerative economic models deliver growth?

The promised benefits of the circular economy are manifold. By maximising product and materials lifecycles through reuse, recycling and repurposing, the circular economy, it is said, will drastically reduce waste and pollution. The knock-on effects will include new profit opportunities for businesses, greater supply chain security and reduced household spending. Moreover, by decoupling economic growth from resource use, the circular economy can reverse biodiversity loss and swap existing “take-make-waste” models of production for regenerative, nature positive processes. In creating new growth opportunities, while eliminating the deleterious effects of linear economics, it is seen as a win-win.

For sceptics, however, it is too good to be true: utopian in design and impossible to operationalise. In the most strident critiques, it serves only to address the concerns of wealthy nations, closing off proven economic development pathways, and inhibiting growth prospects in the Global South.

So, are the architects of this new economic theory well-meaning but misguided? Is the future shape of the global economy circular? Or could we see a gradual blending of linear and circular models?

Audience insights: Strategies for building circularity into business operations and maximising the efficiencies and commercial opportunities that circular models entail.

Themes: Inclusive green growth; Corporate and consumer behaviour change; Climate action beyond carbon

10:00 10:45

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

In focus: The energy transition in China

China's 14th Five Year Plan (FYP), announced by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in June 2022, targets a 50 percent increase in renewable energy generation which would take the national share of power generated by renewables to 50% by 2025. These lofty extend well beyond the domestic market, and are supported by real funds: Chinese capital accounted for over half of global low carbon spending in 2022, and the country remains the world’s largest issuer of green bonds. China also dominates supply chains for critical and rare earth elements, and bulk materials essential for the manufacture of renewables technologies. Nonetheless, China also remains the world’s largest carbon emitter, approving 106 gigawatts of new coal-fired power capacity in 2022 alone. Is the success of the Global Energy Transition contingent on the success of China’s Energy Transition?

Audience insights: An assessment of China’s pivotal role in the global energy transition, as both a principal source of funding and materials for renewables upscale, and major world-leading emitter of greenhouse gases.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Sustainability at scale; Decarbonisation capital

11:15 12:00

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

Climate change adaptation for enhanced climate resilience

The First Global Stocktake conducted COP28 was the most comprehensive exercise yet in measuring progress against critical climate aims. Described by UN Climate Change Executive Secretary Simon Stiell as an exercise in ambition, accountability and acceleration, it served as a benchmark on how far we have travelled, and have yet to travel, on the road to net zero.

It also highlighted the extent to which climate adaptation, or adjustment to irreversible changes in the global climate, is overtaking mitigation in certain aspects of climate action. Though climate change is a global phenomenon, its effects are localised and diverse. Climate adaptation projects, when properly executed, build resilience in communities at heightened risk of extreme climate events. Initiatives include major infrastructure works, nature-based solutions and behavioural changes.  What are the key principles of effective and context specific climate adaptation? And how can policymakers prioritise interventions that are conducive to community resilience, and reduce existing vulnerabilities? 

Audience insights: Measures for ensuring businesses and communities are resilient against the irreversible effects of climate change, and that governments and industries can make a meaningful contribution to that resilience.

Themes: Sustainability at scale; Inclusive green growth; Climate action beyond carbon

12:00 13:00

Global Energy Transition in Action programme

Spotlight 1 Theatre

Session format: Panel discussion

GET Congress 2024 in review

GET Steering Committee members look back at the week’s most thought-provoking insights, covering the Changemakers and Transition in Action programmes, the Roadmaps to Net Zero conference and the Project X-Change.

Audience insights: Our experts reflect on a week of vibrant discussion, practical takeaways and outcomes, and predict how those conversations are likely to evolve over the coming 12 months.

Themes: Net zero impasses; Sustainability at scale; Decarbonisation capital; Inclusive green growth; Corporate and consumer behaviour change; Climate action beyond carbon

13:00

Close of GET Congress 2024

Monday 01 July 2024

Tuesday 02 July 2024

Wednesday 03 July 2024

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*The strategic conference programme panels and timing are subject to change up until the date of the event.